Dietary FAQ

I am confused about allergy vs. intolerance. I understand that our children may be sensitive to corn, soy and other foods as well as gluten and casein. Does this mean that they will eventually start turning these foods into the morphine-like compounds too

Posted in Dietary FAQ

I am confused about allergy vs. intolerance. I understand that our children may be sensitive to corn, soy and other foods as well as gluten and casein. Does this mean that they will eventually start turning these foods into the morphine-like compounds too? If this were the case, would they show up as an allergy on a RAST test? Or were our children were always allergic to these foods (a regular allergy that may cause behavioral changes in our children), and we just didn't know because the gluten and casein were hiding the allergy.

I heard that dairy peptides (from casein) leave the body in about 2-4 days and that<BR>gluten takes much longer. How long does it take to eliminate gluten from the system, or at least bring it down to an acceptable level? Is it possible that gluten might

Posted in Dietary FAQ

I heard that dairy peptides (from casein) leave the body in about 2-4 days and that
gluten takes much longer. How long does it take to eliminate gluten from the system, or at least bring it down to an acceptable level? Is it possible that gluten might never leave the body completely?

Disclaimer

The content on this website is not to be taken as medical advice. We have gathered information here so that you can make an informed decision in partnership with your medical practitioner.

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Lisa S. Lewis, Ph.D.

Lisa S. Lewis, Ph.D. Lisa S. Lewis, Ph.D. is the author of Special Diets For Special Kids I & II, the foremost books on gluten and casein-free diets for children with disabilities.

Karyn Seroussi

Karyn Seroussi Karyn Seroussi is the author of Unraveling the Mystery of Autism and PDD, the story of her son's autism recovery through dietary and other biomedical interventions.

Helping since 1995

Together Lewis and Seroussi created the Autism Network for Dietary Intervention (ANDI.) Since 1995, ANDI has been helping and supporting parents using dietary and biomedical interventions for autism spectrum disorders. Last year, Lisa and Karyn again joined forces and put the sum of their knowledge in a new book, The Encyclopedia of Dietary Interventions. They continue to write and speak on the topic of dietary intervention, and to support other parents around the world.